The life of an introvert: An interview with Tasmin Lowe; freelancer and author – #CommunityMonth

Yay – it’s Community month!


This month, I’m going to introduce you to four wonderful introverts (from all around the world) who are going to share with you their stories and life experiences to shed light on the difficulties introverts face in our society and in their everyday life. But this series is going to be about more than just bringing awareness to the struggles introverts face on the daily!

It’s also about showing you the differences and similarities between us wonderful introverted human beings and help you see yourself from a new and much more positive perspective by looking through the eyes of other introvert from all different places.

I hope you find this series interesting and helpful. I’m so excited about this!

Let’s meet today’s guest: Tasmin Lowe!

Instagram: @thelowe.lywriter

Question: “Want to introduce yourself?”

Answer: My name is Tasmin Lowe, I am 26 years old and I live in South Africa with my husband and our dog Koda. I am a Freelance writer and editor and I’m currently writing my first book, Think With Me (coincidentally about being an introvert!). Writing has always been a passion of mine and is probably something I will continue to pursue.

Q: “Have you always known you were an introvert?”

A: For as long as I have known what an introvert is, I have known it was who I am. I’ve always been shy, uncomfortable at large friend or family gatherings, and have always lived inside of my mind and imagination. Overthinking and creating realistic (and unrealistic) scenarios in my mind throughout each day comes all to naturally to me.

Q: “Has being an introvert influenced your childhood?”

A: In primary school I made one friend in grade one and she became my best friend through to grade seven. But we only became friends because she came up to me one day during breaktime and said I looked alone and sad (her words). I never made friends easily because I preferred to sit quietly on my own and be out of peoples’ way – something that is still a bit true to this day. Luckily, being an introvert, I never needed a lot of friends and held on dearly to the few best friends I did (and do) have.

I was always focused on myself – never played team sports or did extracurricular activities at school. I did gymnastics, competed as an individual and I was more than content with that. Being an introverted child also kept me from speaking up when I felt uncomfortable, which made it difficult for me to speak up in future. I would rather keep quiet and to myself then say something to cause a scene or be the reason someone got into trouble (unless it was my sister – but our sibling rivalry was healthy and is now over).  


Q: “How does your daily life look like as an introvert?”

A: Working from home means my daily schedule is flexible. Most of my days consist of me finding things to do around the house in-between working on my book or odd jobs. 

When I got married, we moved to the small town where my husband grew up and where his parents still stay. It’s quite a distance away from my home community and friends where I used to live. But we usually see his parents every other day to share a meal or I will go for walks with his sister and mother.

While I am happy to be in the house for a few days, I do enjoy getting outside and am so grateful to have family to walk and visit town with. It makes it a more comfortable experience for me in a town that I’m still not entirely familiar with.

Q: “With what kind of situation do you struggle with the most?”

A: I struggle with new experiences the most. Like moving to a small town, for example, where I don’t know anyone except my family-in-law. Having to find a new doctor, dentist, beautician, job, coffee place and grocery store are all stressful to me. I’ve been living here for almost two years now and I still feel anxious to go the shops or make an appointment at the hairdresser. Next year we will be moving overseas to Qatar and I know that in itself will bring its own stresses and struggles but I try not to think about it too much just yet.

Q: “Have there been past experiences that helped you grow as an introvert?”

A: Moving away from home and friends has been good for me as much as it has, at times, been uncomfortable. Having worked in four different jobs with different work environments has also taught me many things and helped me grow. I met so many different types of people and discovered which social situations were easier for me to handle.

Also, I believe that every past experience I have had has helped me grow in the sense that if there is something I have to do that I’ve done before, I focus on how I managed it last time and it makes me less anxious because I know that I am (because I was) capable.

Q: “With what kind of situations do you no longer struggle with? Do you have tips for others?”

A: I’m not as nervous to meet new people. Over the years it’s something you naturally do more of and it becomes slightly easier each time. I do owe most of this to my husband who is the extrovert of the two of us. He makes me feel more comfortable within myself, which makes me less anxious. In fact, since we have moved here, every time I had to go out or do something in town for the first time, he would come with me to help me realize that it’s not as bad as I build it up in my mind to be, and it’s a manageable experience.

My advice then to those who still struggle with certain situations should rely on the people who are there for them. Share your fears and anxieties – they love and accept you, so there’s no reason to feel embarrassed – after all, everyone needs a little help every now and then. And it’s okay to not feel like you can do things on your own, but you need to realize that, in most cases, you aren’t alone.


Q: “What advice would you give your younger self for situations that were uncomfortable?”

A: Elaborate beyond “I don’t want to”, “I don’t feel like” or, my favorite, “I don’t know”. If a loved one is trying to reach out to help you or understand you better, let them. It will help you as well as your relationship with that person. It’s not always necessary to shut people out because you doubt they will understand your reasoning or will think you’re “just being silly”. Anxiety is real. Mental health issues are real. And it’s something people are finally starting to respect – so why wouldn’t they respect you and the traits that come with being an introvert?

Q: “What do you wish for the future of our society regarding introverts?”

A: I wish people would stop labeling introversion as something negative or something that is mostly negative. I don’t hear society going around making extroverts feel bad about themselves so why should we, as introverts, be made to feel bad about who we are? I think we are widely misunderstood with many misconceptions around what it means to be an introvert. With that said, I also wish that society would take a moment to understand us better and that introverts would find a way to express themselves in order to be understood (in whichever way makes them comfortable).

Thank you so much Tasmin for letting us in into your experiences and life as an introvert!

Do you want to reach out to Tasmin? Check out her Instagram @thelowe.lywriter or write her an email to thelowe.lywriter@gmail.com. She’ll be more than happy to welcome you to her Instagram page and answering your messages!

The next interview will be coming soon. Make sure you subcribed to my blog so you’ll be notified as soon as it’s up!

For more inspiration regarding personal growth as an introvert check out my social media (Instagram, Facebook or TikTok). I would really be thrilled to welcome you on all of my platforms and let you into my daily life as an introvert.

3 thoughts on “The life of an introvert: An interview with Tasmin Lowe; freelancer and author – #CommunityMonth”

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